“The Eyes of Thailand” Named as a Finalist in the First International Elephant Film Festival

“The Eyes of Thailand” tells the true and inspirational story of Soraida Salwala’s quest to help two elephant landmine survivors—Motala and Mosha—walk again on their own four legs. Treating their wounds was only part of the journey; building elephant-sized prostheses was another. Narrated by Ashley Judd, the film is story of sacrifice and perseverance that show how far one woman will go to save an endangered species from threats above and below the surface.

This announcement marks the second time the United Nations has honored “The Eyes of Thailand”. The first was at a Special Screening at the International Convention to Ban Landmines in Geneva, Switzerland in December 2016.

On 20 December 2017, the Sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 3 March as World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild fauna and flora. The date is the day of the adoption of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in 1973, which plays an important role in ensuring that international trade does not threaten the species’ survival. World Wildlife Day is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the multitude of benefits that conservation provides to people. At the same time, the Day reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime, which has wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts.

About Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival
Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival’s programs promote public awareness and stewardship of wildlife and wildlife habitat through the innovative use of media from Hanoi to Halong Bay. Since 1991, its annual conferences draw together international leaders in science, conservation, broadcasting and media. For three days this year, committed elephant advocates convened for the Jackson Hole Conservation Summit: Elephants to share resources and strategies, address critical challenges and brainstorm innovative approaches for collaboration. They joined 650+ of the world’s most influential filmmakers and commissioners at the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival to celebrate the world’s finest nature programming and explore innovative ways to integrate media centrally into the battle against global wildlife crime.

About CITES
With 182 Parties, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) remains one of the world’s most powerful tools for wildlife conservation through the regulation of trade. Thousands of species are internationally traded and used by people in their daily lives for food, health care, housing, tourist souvenirs, cosmetics or fashion. CITES regulates international trade in over 35,000 species of plants and animals, including their products and derivatives, to ensure their survival in the wild with benefits for the livelihoods of local people and the global environment. The CITES permit system seeks to ensure that international trade in listed species is sustainable, legal and traceable. CITES was signed in Washington D.C. on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975. Learn more about CITES by visiting www.cites.org